Watch repair blogs

I’m very happy to have had my blog awarded number 8 in the top 15 watch blogs from feedspot! All the more remarkable when I’ve hardly had the time to post any updates this year. Hopefully this will change as soon as possible as I have shedloads of interesting jobs to blog about, watch this space 🙂

Seiko Astron 35-9000

I know updates have taken a back seat this year solely due to the volume of work that keeps coming in but I couldn’t let this pair pass by without a post about them. As most people with an interest in horological history will know, the world’s first quartz wristwatch was introduced on Dec 25th 1969 by Seiko. Called the “Astron” it was powered by Seiko’s 35a quartz movement which had been 10 years in development and was truly a revolution in wristwatch manufacture, in fact the quartz movement changed the face of wristwatch production forever and caused years of change and lets face it some very hard times for watch manufacturers around the rest of the world. The 35a movement’s frequency was 8192 Hz, a quarter of the frequency of quartz oscillators today although the accuracy was still an impressive ±0.2 seconds per day or ±5 seconds per month. One of the major features was its hybrid integrated circuit innovation which consumed far less power than transistors of the time. Another breakthrough was the step motion seconds hand made possible by developing a miniature open step motor, this innovation was adopted by other manufactures of quartz watches later on. This was only possible because Seiko did not pursue monopolization on patent rights of those unique technologies and opened them up to all the world. At the time of release the Astron cost 450,000 yen ($1,250) which at the time was equivalent to the price of a medium-sized car. Even at this high price after the first week Seiko had sold 100 units. The case was made from 18k gold and had a distinctive textured finish, the dial also had a textured finish and the hands were of the simple baton/stick type.

To get to work one one of these historical pieces is a joy but to get two in at the same time, one date and the other non date, really was an honour. The owner is a huge Seiko collector with one of the most comprehensive collections of vintage Seikos on the planet. The watches came in with the non date version in a non running state and the date version running. Both required servicing because there was no baseline established as the history of both pieces was unknown. Obviously we were hoping the non running examples problems were caused by either something mechanical or a dirty connection. Below is the quintessential no date Astron.

1970 Seiko 35a Astron Quartz (more…)

Lemania HS9 Chronograph calibre 15CHT

This lovely Lemania HS9 came in as a non runner recently for a spot of fettling and a service. These models are known as the HS9 after the engraving on the caseback. HS stands for Hydrographic Supplies (or Services), a government organisation tasked with the procurement of timepieces (and other devices) for the Navy. The 9 is the number of the specification that this watch was made to meet which was a wrist chronograph. Specifications 1 to 8 included normal wristwatches, deck chronometers, pocket watches and so forth. So this model is made for the UK government for issue to the Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm. This one is a silver dialled example but they did come issued with a white dial (with no luminous compound) for use on nuclear submarines and black dialed ones were issued to the RAF. These Lemania models were supplied to many armed forces the world over and are one of the nicest issued military watches in my opinion. It’s powered by the beautiful manual wind, 18,000bpm Lemania 15CHT movement. The dial has everything going for it, it’s Lemania signed with the company logo above, below that is the T – circle logo indicating the luminous compound is tritium based (rather than earlier radium), it has the broad arrow above the 6 denoting it was government property and it doesn’t have the long dash of luminous compound at the six o’clock marker which is sometimes seen. The crown isn’t the original but the style does suit the watch so it’s not too big a deal.

Lemania HS9 calbre 15 CHT (more…)

Happy new year everybody – the start of another one!

Well 2016 is now behind us, thank goodness, it wasn’t a particularly good year on a personal level with accidents, deaths in the family and one thing and another. Unfortunately all this impacted quite severely on my ability to keep this blog updated on a regular basis. Having said that the work has been coming in thick and fast all year so I thought I’d show a little of what’s been across the bench to try and make up for the lack of updates.

I’ve seen quite a lot of vintage Seiko exotica on the bench last year including some early 6159-7000’s.

Seiko 6159-7000 (more…)

Seiko 6138/9 sweep hand issues

Hello everyone! To start with, apologies for the lack of updates over the past few months but it’s been very hectic here on a personal level as well as a business one. Without going into too much detail my parents were involved in quite a serious car crash at the beginning of the summer, my father escaped relatively unscathed but my mother and a passenger weren’t so lucky. Thankfully they’re both back home now but my mother was in hospital for three months and is now having to learn to walk again, which at the age of 80 is going to take some time. As if this wasn’t enough at the beginning of September my partners father suddenly and unexpectedly died, this was a huge shock and taking care of his wife and all the things that a death in the family brings with it has taken some time. I’ve been working seven days a week (when I’ve been home) to try and keep on top of the work queue and things are slowly getting back to normal.

Anyway I thought I’d do a little informational post on something I see on a regular basis and that’s misaligned 6138/9 sweep hands. The bullhead pictured below came in for a movement service but as you can see the sweep hand consistently resets to the 1 second past position which means it’s been fitted incorrectly.

6138-0040 (more…)

Rolex 16600 Sea Dweller

This Rolex Sea Dweller ref 16600 came in recently for a service and I thought I’d feature it as I love these particular watches, I’ve had one for many years and they are my favourite Rolex sports watch. I’ve had them, sold them, tried vintage Rolex (5513 & 16800) but have always returned to the ref 16600 – there’s just something about them! The one featured is an F from 2004, meaning the serial number starts with the letter F. The various letters denote years of manufacture and this is a handy way of dating your Rolex if your not sure how old it is, however Rolex now uses random serial numbers which just isn’t cricket 🙂

Rolex 16600 Sea Dweller (more…)