Sekonda Slava 2427

Sekonda is a British distributor of watches that these days are imported from Asia, but up until 1993 it sourced it’s watches from Russian manufacturers, the majority being rebranded Raketa or Poljots. Unusually the subject of this article is a Sekonda branded Slava. Slava watches were produced in Russia at the Second Moscow Watch Factory for USSRs civilian population and the word Slava when translated into English means ‘Glory’. The 2427 movement is an interesting one due to its twin winding barrels. This example came in for a service as it was running poorly.

Sekonda Slava 2427

The caseback is a two piece affair with a pressed steel back secured by a locking ring.

Sekonda Slava 2427

The calibre 2427 is relatively low beat, a 26 jewel, 18,000bph, automatic, day date affair.

Sekonda Slava 2427

With the rotor removed there’s evidence of one of this calibres weak points, namely rotor post and rotor bearing wear. The rotor had a load of lateral movement and wouldn’t turn freely as it caught on the movement which was covered in tiny particles of rotor post and bearing!

Sekonda Slava 2427

The handset and dial bearing the legend ‘Made in USSR’.

Sekonda Slava 2427

The day and date rings are found beneath.

Sekonda Slava 2427

A peek at the calendar mechanism.

Sekonda Slava 2427

Another interesting point is the quickset mechanism for this calibre is added onto an extra ring that the mainplate secures to.

Sekonda Slava 2427

The movement sans quickset mechanism/ring. Five of the movements 26 jewels are ring bearings located on five pillars around the circumference, these support the date ring.

Sekonda Slava 2427

With the movement turned over I can start stripping the motion work side. Here you can see the twin barrels with a five wheel ratchet train to allow manual winding!

Sekonda Slava 2427

With the autowind mechanism removed you can see there are three separate bridges for the motion work.

Sekonda Slava 2427

The two barrels are ready for removal here.

Sekonda Slava 2427

The movement was now fully stripped and ready for cleaning and inspection.

Sekonda Slava 2427

Sekonda Slava 2427

After inspection, during which a new rotor post and rotor was found to be needed, the rebuild could start.

Sekonda Slava 2427

Second, third and fourth wheels back in position here.

Sekonda Slava 2427

I’d refitted the train bridge and barrels in this shot.

Sekonda Slava 2427

The movements calendar side with the keyless work and quickset ring refitted.

Sekonda Slava 2427

The date ring refitted onto its five jewelled bearings.

Sekonda Slava 2427

The dial and handset is back on here.

Sekonda Slava 2427

A good used rotor post and rotor was found, when they are compared you can see the wear on the old one. The replacement parts were advertised as NOS but I’m pretty sure they weren’t!

Sekonda Slava 2427

The autowind mechanism is refitted in this shot.

Sekonda Slava 2427

A new crystal was fitted as the old one was too deeply marked for polishing.

Sekonda Slava 2427

The movement is now refitted and the case is ready for closing.

Sekonda Slava 2427

And there she is, ready for a few more years of use! Not a bad looking watch (1980’s I guess) and it has survived remarkably well – especially the plating on the case.

Sekonda Slava 2427

Sekonda Slava 2427

Sekonda Slava 2427

By pressing the button in the slot (above the crown) with your fingernail you can quickset the date. In the words of Boney M – ‘Oh those Russians’ (apologies to anyone under the age of 40)!

Sekonda Slava 2427

4 comments

  1. Hi i have cccp gold soviet submarine commander watch and it’s works when i put him on flat surface but every time when i try to wear on the wrist it stop working . Then again i have to shake him and start running and stop when its up side down ??

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  2. Nice & informative review,
    I am a collector & enthusiast and I always keep finding these Slava movements interesting. What even makes this soviet/russian movement even more curious, is that it was designed from scratch by Slava, rather than being a “clever improvement” or a direct analogue of an existing swiss type (some of the clones vere actually licensed, not copied).

    Even with its minor flaws, like rotor bearing wear (many Rolex watches with similar bearing have the same issue) and slightly shock sensitive balance pivot, it is very enjoyable with its low beat and surpising accuracy.

    This Slava family of movements, particularly S2427 & 2416 have found their way to many many Hong Kong/China made cases and “mushroom brand” watches. I personally enjoy many examples in my collection. It seems that for a moment during late 80s – mid 90s Slava 2427 was quite popular as an affordable but well featured automatic movement. Probably at that time there were no comparable chinese automatics and ETA automatics were much more upscale in pricing. Many of these were made for impoters in West-Germany, fitted with nice custom made german day discs. Also some shady Seiko 5 clones with custom spanish day discs have appeared.

    In my opinion, it is a movement well worth having in any collection, powering reliably original Slava/Sekonda watches of the era and making many chunky, modern “mushroom watches” more interesting and unique.

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  3. Very interesting, thank you. I have a Moscow Time which uses the same movement – probably not from USSR but Asian as I think it’s more recent. It’s a great time keeper

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